Australian indie bands and artists for 2019

  

Australian indie bands and artists for 2019

Australia's music scene has always been innovative, with many new and established artists possessing a real uniqueness and contemporary edge. From Melbourne and Sydney, to all over the country, the slew of exciting new artists shows no sign of slowing down. Sampha The Great's creative hip hop and Courtney Barnett's fuzzy indie tunes are sure to keep on sweeping Australia - and the rest of the world - off its feet.
Vallis Alps
Electronic duo Vallis Alps are Sydney-based producer David Ansari and vocalist Parissa Tosif, and have been garnering attention since they released their first single, “Young” in 2015. Since then, they've been creating soulful, soothing electronic beats while bringing attention to political issues around the world; their single “Oceans,” released in 2017, was written about 19th century feminist icon Tahirih, an Iranian women's rights activist. With their beguiling mixture of synth pop, hip hop and chilled electronic beats, Vallis Alps are ones to watch.
Jade Imagine
Melbourne four-piece Jade Imagine are led by singer-songwriter Jade McInally and together create guitar-based music with witty and insightful lyrics. With memorable lo fi, fuzzy sounds, their first shimmery EP was released through Courtney Barnett's Milk! Records label in 2017, and to critical acclaim. 2019 is due to bring even more touring around the country, so keep your eye out for a chance to see them live.
Oh Pep!
Duo Olivia Hally and Pepita Emmachs have been creating music together since they met in secondary school in Melbourne, and already have three EPs and two albums to their name. They've toured at music festivals around the world, from SXSW to Primavera and Glastonbury, and the international fanbase for their soulful, synth pop is steadily growing as they go. 2019 is set to be another great year for them, as they continue to showcase their experimental music to an international stage.
Hatchie
Hailing from Brisbane, Hatchie is the musical project of Harriette Pilbeam, a 25-year-old Brisbane native. Her unique style of dream pop, reminiscent of 80 bands like the Cocteau Twins and the Cranberries, has been earning her attention since 2017. In 2018, she released her debut EP Sugar and Spice, and is based in Brooklyn after her work gained a huge amount of attention in the United States.
Sampha The Great
Sampha The Great is the musical project of Sampha Tembo, an Australian poet and rapper from Sydney. Originally born in Zambia and raised in Botswana, Sampha creates hip hop music with politically conscious lyrics, often raising the visibility of black and Indigenous artists in Australia, to a background of addictive abstract hip hop beats.
Courtney Barnett
While an indie music heavyweight more than a newcomer, Courtney Barnett's career is due to grow from strength to strength in 2019. Her deadpan, witty singing style and rambling lyrics - often telling stories - has been acclaimed since 2013. Now with her own record label and two full albums under her belt, the Melbourne born artist continues to produce and champion great Australian music. 2019 will see Courtney touring at festivals all over the world - from Tokyo to Buenos Aires.
Amy Shark
Another Aussie musician with a huge fan base and multiple ARIA awards under her belt, Amy Shark continues to make joyful electronic indie pop with a streetwise attitude. Born and raised in the Gold Coast, her debut album Love Monster was released in 2018, and reached number 1 in the Australian charts. Her success is bound to spread with music fans around the world pricking their ears up, and a string of worldwide shows planned for the year ahead.
DyspOra
Hailing from Adelaide, DyspOra (also known as Gabriel Akon) is an Australian South Sudanese-born rapper who is taking the Australian hip hop world by storm. As well as producing innovative tracks with politically charged lyrics, DyspOra is focused on growing the hip hop scene in Australia. The artist started writing his own poetry at the age of 12 and was writing lyrics by the time he reached high school. Still a fan of poetry and spoken word, you can often find him at readings around Adelaide. He's even created his own record label, Playback 808, which is growing from strength to strength and which DyspOra releases his own music on.

 

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